Juvenile Trends

Justice Mary Beth Kelly Appointed to the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

Justice Mary Beth Kelly, Chair of the Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice (MCJJ), has been appointed to the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ).

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States Move Toward Treating 17-Year-Old Offenders as Juveniles, Not Adults

In a New York Times article titled "States Move Toward Treating 17-Year-Old Offenders as Juveniles, Not Adults" Erik Eckholm describes how states are are participating in a national “raise the age” movement that has won bipartisan support.

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House Committee OKs Raising Age For Juvenile Crimes To 17

Those 17 and under would be placed into the juvenile criminal justice system instead of the current 16 and under, except for the most serious crimes, under legislation unanimously approved Tuesday by the House Criminal Justice Committee.

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U.S. Supreme Court Orders Juvenile Lifers to Get Parole Consideration

The U. S. Supreme Court has ruled that its 2012 ban on automatic life sentences without parole for those who committed crimes as juveniles must be applied retroactively. The ruling means more than 350 Michigan prisoners sentenced for crimes committed when they were 16 or younger may be considered for parole.

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Technical Assistance Offered for Youth in Custody Practice Model

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) and the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA), will provide technical assistance to up to three agencies to implement the new Youth in Custody Practice Model.

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Detroit News Supports Juvenile Justice Reform

In an editorial headlined "Raise the Age," the Detroit News supported legislative efforts aimed at treating juvenile offenders differently than adults and giving them the best chance to become productive, law-abiding adults.

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MCJJ Chair Testifies in Support of Juvenile Justice Reforms

Mary Beth Kelly, chair of the Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice, voiced her support of legislation to treat more young people in the juvenile justice system, rather than the adult criminal justice system.

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Legislation Would Raise Age for Adult Prosecution

Bipartisan legislation has been announced to permit 17-year-olds to be processed in Michigan's juvenile courts, rather than automatically prosecuted as adults.

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2013 Juvenile Arrest Data Available on MCJJ Web Site

New information on juvenile arrests and juvenile arrest rates in Michigan in 2013 is now available on this Web site. The data are broken down by type of crime and gender, age, and race. It includes arrest information for the state as a whole and for each county.

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Appeals Court Declares Juveniles' Right to Sentencing by Jury in Life-Without-Parole Cases

Michigan juveniles convicted in adult courts have the right to let a jury decide sentences when they face the possibility of a life sentence with no possibility of parole, the Michigan Court of Appeals has ruled. The ruling is expected to be appealed to the Michigan Supreme Court.

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Editorial Endorses Effective Diversion Programs

The Detroit News recently published an editorial calling for strong state efforts to protect juvenile offenders and keep them out of prison.

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Justice Kelly Stepping Down from Supreme Court, Will remain MCJJ Chair

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Mary Beth Kelly, who chairs the Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice, announced she is stepping down from the high court on Oct. 1. She will remain as chair of the MCJJ and plans to focus more attention on juvenile justice.

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Governor Snyder Calls for Juvenile Justice Reform

Governor Rick Snyder wants more youth put into diversion programs, rather than the juvenile justice system, to improve their chances of success as youths and adults.

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Muskegon Works to Reduce School Expulsions and Suspensions

Muskegon area school districts have launched a pilot program to provide support to students, rather than suspensions and expulsions. The goal is to keep them in school and get them on the right track.

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Rape Elimination Efforts Slow, Newspaper Says

The New York Times reports that the pace of changes to protect prisoners from rape has slowed.

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Report Finds Michigan Youth Incarceration Policies Unfair and Ineffective

Thousands of Michigan children and youth have been incarcerated in the adult prison system because of policies that are ineffective, unfair, and costly, according to a new report by the Michigan Council on Crime and Delinquency.

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Justice Policy Institute Reports Highlight Work Across U.S.

The cost of the consequences of youth incarceration could be between $8 billion and $21 billion a year, according to a Justice Policy Institute report.

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New York Commission Recommends Juvenile Justice Reforms

The New York Governor's Commission on Youth, Public Safety and Justice has made a series of recommendations for juvenile justice reform. Among other things, it would raise the age of criminal responsibility from 16 to 18.

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Texas Research Finds Youth Do Better with Community Supervision

Texas youth involved in the juvenile justice system are far less likely to reoffend if they are under community-based supervision rather than confined in state correctional facilities, according to a report by the Council of State Governments Justice Center.

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States Advancing Juvenile Justice Reforms, Report Finds

Nearly half of the states have enacted laws and policies reducing the prosecution of youth in adult criminal courts and ending the placement of youth in adult jails and prisons, the Campaign for Youth Justice reported in State Trends: Legislative Victories from 2011-2013 Removing Youth from the Adult Criminal Justice System.

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